New York Times podcast ‘Modern Love’ worth falling in love with this Valentine’s Day

New York Times' podcast

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New York Times' podcast "Modern Love" is a great Valentines Day treat.

Katie Atkinson, Staff Writer

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Valentine’s Day is nearing, and love is in the air. Or, the airwaves, I should say, thanks to the New York Times’ relaunch of their highly-acclaimed “Modern Love” series this month. One of my most beloved essay collections, “Modern Love” truly comes to life in its new form — a podcast that is easy to digest and just as pleasing to the ear.

If you’re unfamiliar with the print version of “Modern Love,” I must say it is a real treat. Much different from other New York Times content, this section regularly features reader-submitted essays that explore love as we know it. And now followers of the series can enjoy it on the go.

With the help of Boston’s NPR station WRUB, “Modern Love” has become more vivid than ever. While only a handful of episodes have been released, the quality of the pieces has more than made up for the quantity.

In the show’s first episode, “A Craigslist ‘Missed Connection’ Lure,” listeners are taken on a journey of a young woman who believes her Craigslist connection to be Mr. Perfect, only to find that he’s more of a hoax than husband material.

But “Modern Love” makes a point of not just being about the dramatic. It’s about more than chemistry or lust. It’s about love in all of its forms. Sometimes that love stems from grief.

This is the case in “Just One Last Swirl Around the Bowl,” a passionate story about a man who finds himself in love with a common goldfish. His daughter’s pet reminds him of his parents who passed away from cancer. The emotion behind this episode is beautiful. And the narration, which is voiced by beloved actor Jason Alexander, is very well executed.

What makes the podcast version of “Modern Love” such a gem is the added commentary provided by the show’s host and the essayists themselves. The story and interview combination is one that really works for this medium. This process has given “Modern Love” the extra push it needs to be successful in the world of audio.

Enchanting and thought-provoking, the NYT and NPR brainchild is worth falling in love with this season.

 

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