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Podcasts: not just your recorded lectures


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Stuck in Atlanta traffic? Soothe your road rage with the wonderful world of podcasts. No, I am not referring to the recorded lectures by your last monotone professor (we do not want you sleeping behind the wheel). Podcasts are recorded spoken entertainment and are streamed from channels, usually via a site such as iTunes or on your mobile device, via an app such as the Podcast App. Their topics are as diverse as TV channels. If you like radio talk shows, podcasts may be for you. As a healthcare student, I have always found the Science & Health channels fascinating and edifying.  Here are some of my favorites, with each representing a unique style of podcasting.

 

NPR Invisibilia

NPR, National Public radio, has many podcasts, with Invisibilia highlighting scientific principles through a human light, using a technique called storytelling. This show weaves exposition, interviews, rhetorical questions, and news journalism to immerse you into the personal impact scientific theories can make. Though this podcast in currently on hiatus, its pilot season can be found here.

 

Science Magazine

Science magazine podcast presents a weekly “round-up” of its original scientific research and breaking stories featured in its online news site and monthly magazine. The podcast hosts often interview the researcher themselves to break down their complex research designs. This Q&A process reflections the process of following the logic of research and critiquing project designs, which have helped me tremendously in my own research.

 

Food and Drug Administration Drug Safety Podcast

 

Why get spammed with daily news emails from your professional organization subscriptions when you can listen to breaking news on your commute? As a pharmacy student, that’s why I have subscribed to the FDA’s Drug Safety Podcast, where they report recent product recalls, warnings, and updates in 3-minute clips. Yes, it can be dry, but we all have an obligation to stay at the top of our profession. So try finding a podcast for your career interests!

 

Your own!

 

You have a voice and perspective that is waiting to be heard. All you need is a script, research on your topic, and a microphone. You can enhance your sound quality and add effects using sound-editing software such as Garageband (Apple) or a free downloadable one called Audacity. Luckily, Atlanta’s Swilley Library actually has a recording studio on its lower level; just ask permission from the front desk. Let it be your lab for to broadcast your interests to the world.

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Podcasts: not just your recorded lectures