‘Sherlock’ season 3 keeps viewers guessing

The Brits are rapidly climbing the ladder of American entertainment. English musicians such as Adele, Mumford & Sons and One Direction have become top-chart artists in the U.S. This British Invasion II, however, encompasses more media than solely music, with BBC television series sparking their own popularity.

From “Downton Abbey” to “Doctor Who,” British television has caught on and spread like wild fire, occupying the “tellies” in households across the U.S. The reigning show for many audiences is the modernized tale of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s iconic detective, Sherlock Holmes, in “Sherlock.” The game was back on as the third season premiered in January only to air its conclusion in the same month.

The three movie-length episodes introduced new characters and mind-boggling plot twists, but left audiences with even more questions without providing a reasonable highly anticipated explanation for one fundamental question: How is Sherlock Holmes alive?

After the season two finale, many theories were given as to how the brilliant Holmes faked a convincing suicide– some were more ridiculous than others.

Indifferent to the theories and the truth, Sherlock’s best friend and crime-solving partner, John Watson proved justly incensed by Sherlock’s two-year absence. “I don’t care how you faked it Sherlock. I want to know why,” said Watson, successfully infuriating the show’s viewers. The truth still remains a mystery.

The second episode was found wanting of significant overarching plot progression, and served as a tame entertaining buffer sandwiched between two “edge-of-your-seat” thrillers.

The season finale, however, concluded with a jaw-dropping plot twist that left “Sherlock” devotees stunned.

As the success of this series has skyrocketed, so has the renown of its actors. Benedict Cumberbatch (Sherlock) has grown significantly more popular as his resume continues to rapidly grow with roles in feature films including “August: Osage County” (Little Charles Aiken) and “The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug” (Smaug).

Cumberbatch’s performance of the “high-functioning sociopath” is arguably the most convincing current portrayal of the iconic crime solver on film and TV, shadowing other notable performances from Robert Downey Jr. in the “Sherlock Holmes” film series and Jonny Lee Miller in the CBS television show “Elementary.”

To many hardcore fans, Cumberbatch is Holmes. He gives a performance that is simultaneously endearing and exasperating. Audiences of the female persuasion seem to be particularly drawn to the actor’s sharp looks…dimples…striking blue eyes…deep voice…tall and lean build… accent…everything.

Much to the delight of such adoring fans, the show’s writer, Steven Moffat, has confirmed intentions to continue with a fourth season. It is anticipated to air sometime around December of this year.

As eager audiences wait in anticipation of more mysteries, they will have to bide their time with other activities while they experience “Sherlock” withdrawals.

To many faithful viewers, having to turn to other television programing will be an experience as ordinary as Sherlock’s parents. But to quote to the great mind himself, “It’s a cross [we] have to bare.” At least until December.